My StrengthsFinder Results. Part 2 of 5 – Learner

This is part two of a five part series.  Click here for Part One, Arranger.

You love to learn. The subject matter that interests you most will be determined by your other themes and experiences, but whatever the subject, you will always be drawn to the process of learning. The process, more than the content or the result, is especially exciting for you. You are energized by the steady and deliberate journey from ignorance to competence.  The thrill of the first few facts, the early efforts to recite or practice what you have learned, the growing confidence of a skill mastered—this is the process that entices you.

I agree that I can be tenacious in figuring things out.  But I’ve learned over the years that sometimes the best thing for me to do is allow the learning to come to me – in other words, if I am stuck on an issue that I am finding difficult to grasp I walk away from it for a while.  It is amazing how often I wake up and know the answer to whatever I was trying to force myself to figure out just the day before.

 

Your excitement leads you to engage in adult learning experiences—yoga or piano lessons or graduate classes.

Hah!  This is funny.  I’ve made my living off of computers for over two decades and I have never taken a single computer class.  Everything I know is self-taught, or learned through mentors, coworkers, bosses and employees.  Same for anything else I am interested in – I tend to find my own path.  I don’t like working at the pace most "formal education" is taught at. 

My son is in college right now and has an advanced math class that takes place three days a week, for an hour at a time.  That seems like such a waste to me.  I would think that one class a week that was three hours long would be much more effective.  But perhaps that is just me.

 

It enables you to thrive in dynamic work environments where you are asked to take on short project assignments and are expected to learn a lot about the new subject matter in a short period of time and then move on to the next one. This Learner theme does not necessarily mean that you seek to become the subject matter expert, or that you are striving for the respect that accompanies a professional or academic credential. The outcome of the learning is less significant than the “getting there.”

This fits me to a "T".  There are very few things I try to become "expert" at.  I have an old business card here that has my job title as "JOAT" – short for "Jack of all Trades".  An ex-CEO made those cards for me.  I have another card that has a tag-line of, "I know a little bit about a lot of things, but I don’t know a hell of a lot about anything".  While I thought that line was funny, it wasn’t really accurate.  There are certainly things I know a great deal about – but in general, it speaks to the theme that my goal isn’t to become the best in class at any single thing.  I prefer to know a bit about a wide variety of things.

The next section (hopefully tomorrow) will be about the theme (or talent) that StrengthsFinder calls "Restorative".

 

Learner

You love to learn. The subject matter that interests you most will be determined by your other themes and experiences, but whatever the subject, you will always be drawn to the process of learning. The process, more than the content or the result, is especially exciting for you. You are energized by the steady and deliberate journey from ignorance to competence. The thrill of the first few facts, the early efforts to recite or practice what you have learned, the growing confidence of a skill mastered—this is the process that entices you. Your excitement leads you to engage in adult learning experiences—yoga or piano lessons or graduate classes. It enables you to thrive in dynamic work environments where you are asked to take on short project assignments and are expected to learn a lot about the new subject matter in a short period of time and then move on to the next one. This Learner theme does not necessarily mean that you seek to become the subject matter expert, or that you are striving for the respect that accompanies a professional or academic credential. The outcome of the learning is less significant than the “getting there.”