My StrengthsFinder Results. Part 1 of 5 – Arranger

StrengthsFinder is an online assessment tool that claims to determine what you are good at.

They ask a series of questions, and you have 20 seconds to respond. The questions are of the variety “I like to see people happy” measured against “I like to make people happy”. That’s not a real question, but you know the type.

Anyway, a company I am in talks with asked me to take this test and they paid for it (and sent me the corresponding book) – then they told me it was cool to share the results.

The last time I took a test like this was in 1988 or so – whenever Circuit City told me I wasn’t qualified enough to manage their new store, but I was overqualified to WORK in it.

Anyway, the test looks at 34 different “themes”, or characteristics. The report shows you your top five (I would LOVE to have also seen my bottom five!)

Over the next (however long it takes me) I will go over one section at a time, and comment on them. I’ll tell you if I agree, disagree, why I think this is important, etc. In the bottom of each post I will quote the entire text sent (for that section) to me by StrengthsFinder.

If you find this boring, bummer 🙂 I think it will be interesting.

At least I hope so!

You are a conductor. When faced with a complex situation involving many factors, you enjoy managing all of the variables, aligning and realigning them until you are sure you have arranged them in the most productive configuration possible. In your mind there is nothing special about what you are doing. You are simply trying to figure out the best way to get things done.

I think this is pretty accurate. Recently I have been called a “connector” which isn’t really different. I certainly feel like I do my best work in a chaotic environment – or at least what most people might think is chaotic. To me it is fun.

But others, lacking this theme, will be in awe of your ability. “How can you keep so many things in your head at once?” they will ask. “How can you stay so flexible, so willing to shelve well-laid plans in favor of some brand-new configuration that has just occurred to you?” But you cannot imagine behaving in any other way. You are a shining example of effective flexibility, whether you are changing travel schedules at the last minute because a better fare has popped up or mulling over just the right combination of people and resources to accomplish a new project.

I do not understand why this would “awe” anyone. It’s the only way I know how to work. That you may not understand it does confuse me. Why would anyone assume that something was ever solved? I solve, and re-solve, and then run the numbers again. Constantly. Doesn’t everyone?

From the mundane to the complex, you are always looking for the perfect configuration. Of course, you are at your best in dynamic situations. Confronted with the unexpected, some complain that plans devised with such care cannot be changed, while others take refuge in the existing rules or procedures. You don’t do either. Instead, you jump into the confusion, devising new options, hunting for new paths of least resistance, and figuring out new partnerships—because, after all, there might just be a better way.

I’m not sure how much attention I really give “the mundane”. I like things that change a lot, change frequently, and need my constant tinkering. If I can’t tinker, I don’t see where I am adding value. But that said, I do love a good chaotic situation. This is probably what drew me into emergency medicine 25 years ago. Now I am just fixing different “breaks” and “leaks”, and DOA’s. The adrenaline is still the same.

So I am an “Arranger”. And I am cool with that. I can’t disagree. I love putting puzzle pieces together.

Stay tuned for part two – “Learner”

Arranger

You are a conductor. When faced with a complex situation involving many factors, you enjoy managing all of the variables, aligning and realigning them until you are sure you have arranged them in the most productive configuration possible. In your mind there is nothing special about what you are doing. You are simply trying to figure out the best way to get things done. But others, lacking this theme, will be in awe of your ability. “How can you keep so many things in your head at once?” they will ask. “How can you stay so flexible, so willing to shelve well-laid plans in favor of some brand-new configuration that has just occurred to you?” But you cannot imagine behaving in any other way. You are a shining example of effective flexibility, whether you are changing travel schedules at the last minute because a better fare has popped up or mulling over just the right combination of people and resources to accomplish a new project. From the mundane to the complex, you are always looking for the perfect configuration. Of course, you are at your best in dynamic situations. Confronted with the unexpected, some complain that plans devised with such care cannot be changed, while others take refuge in the existing rules or procedures. You don’t do either. Instead, you jump into the confusion, devising new options, hunting for new paths of least resistance, and figuring out new partnerships—because, after all, there might just be a better way.